School badge

 

Hate incidents and hate crimes are acts of violence or hostility directed at people because of who they are or who someone thinks they are. For example, you may have had abuse shouted at you on the street because you were holding hands with your same-sex partner.

 

Police forces in England and Wales make a distinction between a hate crime and a hate incident.

 

A hate incident is defined as any act, which may or may not be a crime, that the victim or any other person perceives to be motivated by hostility or prejudice towards an aspect of a person’s identity. Hate incidents include:

 

·      verbal abuse like name-calling

 

·      harassment

 

·      physical attacks such as hitting, punching, pushing, spitting

 

·      threats of violence

 

·      hoax calls, abusive phone or text messages, hate mail

 

·      online abuse for example on Facebook or Twitter

 

·      harm or damage to things such as your home, pet, vehicle

 

·      graffiti

 

·      arson.

 

A hate crime is any illegal act that the victim or any other person perceives to be motivated by hostility or prejudices towards an aspect of a person's identity.

 

When an act is classed as a hate crime, the judge can impose a tougher sentence on the offender under the Criminal Justice Act 2003.

 

Homophobia, biphobia and transphobia

 

Homophobic, biphobic or transphobic hate crimes or incidents are motivated by the offender's hostility or prejudice towards lesbian, gay, bi or trans people.

 

Anyone can be a victim of a homophobic, biphobic or transphobic incident - it does not matter if the victim is lesbian, gay, bi, trans or straight.

 

It is a hate crime if someone shouts homophobic, biphobic or transphobic abuse at someone in the street, or physically attacks them because they think they're gay, lesbian, bi or trans.

We will never tolerate Hate at GFS if you or someone you know has or is experiance this please report it via this website or to a member of staff.